FW: DNA Repair Interest Group -UPDATE - November 2, 2001

Charles Miller rellim at tulane.edu
Mon Nov 5 13:41:34 EST 2001


----------
From: "Kenneth H. Kraemer" <khk at nih.gov>
Reply-To: Ken Kraemer <kraemerk at nih.gov>
Date: Fri, 2 Nov 2001 17:59:33 -0500
To: DNAREPAIR-L at LIST.NIH.GOV
Subject: DNA Repair Interest Group -UPDATE - November 2, 2001

DNA Repair Interest Group -UPDATE - November 2, 2001

1.      VIDEOCONFERENCE - Nov 13, 2001 - Dr. Christopher States -
University of Louisville- Cisplatin regulation of XPA expression in
ovarian cancer cells
2.      X-RAY SCANNING OF MAIL AND BIOLOGICAL SPECIMENS
3.      CONFERENCES - FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS CONFERENCE; ENVIRONMENTAL
MUTAGEN SOCIETY
4.      POST DOC AND EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Bethesda, MD; Research
Triangle Park, NC; Livermore, CA; Baltimore, MD; Irvine, CA; Portland, OR;
Davis, CA; Livermore, CA; Berkeley, CA; Boston, MA
5.      Electronic Contacts



1.0     DNA REPAIR VIDEOCONFERENCE:

Nov 13, 2001 - Tues 12:30PM - Dr. Christopher States - University of
Louisville- Cisplatin regulation of XPA expression in ovarian cancer cells

VIDEOCONFERENCE LOCATIONS:  Building 45 (NATCHER) Room H, Bethesda, MD;
Building 101 Room B200, NIEHS, Research Triangle Park, NC; State
University of New York, Stony Brook, NY; Room 1E03 GRC Baltimore, MD; MD
Anderson, Smithville, TX; Univ of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (origin);
Building 549, Conference Room A,  FCRDC, Frederick, MD; Lawrence Livermore
Labs, Livermore, CA; Univ of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Brookhaven National
Labs, Upton, NY and University of Pittsburgh and live on the internet at
http://videocast.nih.gov

1.1     DNA REPAIR VIDEOCONFERENCE - FUTURE DATES AND VIDEO ARCHIVE
[Note: A larger and more up to date list of future and past
videoconferences can be found on the DNA Repair Interest Group web site:
http://www.nih.gov:80/sigs/dna-rep/ ]

1.1.1 FUTURE VIDEOCONFERENCES:

Dec 18, 2001 - Tues 12:30PM - Dr. Richard Wood - Univ of Pittsburgh-
Tolerating damaged DNA

Jan 15, 2002 - Tues 12:30PM - Dr. Tom Kunkel- NIEHS - Recent studies of
DNA Mismatch Repair

Feb 19, 2002 - Tues 12:30PM - Dr. Yves Pommier - NCI - Nucleotide excision
repair-dependent cytotoxicity of a novel anticancer agent, ecteinascidin
743.

Mar 19, 2002 - Tues 12:30PM - TBA

Apr 16, 2002 - Tues 12:30PM - Dr. Philip Hanawalt - History of DNA Repair

May 21, 2002 - Tues 12:30PM - TBA

June 18, 2002 - Tues 12:30PM - Dr. David Chen - Lawrence Berkeley National
Lab - Role of DNA-PK in Cellular Responses to DNA damage


1.1.2 VIDEOARCHIVES: INTERNET ACCESS (WORLDWIDE):
Now 39 of these videoconferences have been archived and are available for
viewing at your leisure on the internet. You will need a web browser (with
a high speed link) and free Real Video software.  Setup details and access
are available at the NIH videocast website:  http://videocast.nih.gov. Go
to Unicast sessions; Past events; DNA Repair Interest Group Sessions.

Note: Technical improvements are made regularly on this site to increase
transmission speeds and ease of access. If you were not successful in
viewing these videos in the past it is worth trying again!

Oct 16, 2001 - Dr. Daniel Yarosh - Applied Genetics - Reduction of Skin
Cancer in XP Patients Treated Topically with DNA Repair Enzymes

JUNE 19, 2001 - Dr. James Cleaver -Univ of California, San Francisco, CA -
History of DNA Repair - Mending Human Genes

MAY 15, 2001- Dr. Bill Copeland - Laboratory of Molecular Genetics NIEHS -
Family A DNA polymerases in eukaryotic DNA replication and repair [NEW
POSTING!]

MAR 20, 2001 - Short talks at 3 sites:
Peter Beernink, LLNL - A Second Divalent Metal Ion in the Active Site of a
New Crystal Form of Human Apurinic/Apyridinimic Endonuclease, Ape1, and
its Implications for the Catalytic Mechanism

Yong Hwan Jin, NIEHS - The 3'-5' Exonuclease of DNA Polymerase d is
Redundant with
5'-flap Endonuclease Rad27/Fen1 for Processing of Okazaki Fragments

Robert M. Brosh, NIA - Molecular Interactions of the Werner Syndrome
Protein

FEB 20, 2001 - Dr. Vilhelm Bohr - LMG, NIA, Baltimore, MD -  DNA repair
defects in premature aging disorders

JAN 16, 2001- Dr. Mats Ljungman - Univ of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI -Stopped
in its tracks - RNA polymerase II as a sensor for DNA damage

DEC 19, 2000 - Dr. Patrick Sung - University of Texas Health Science
Center at San Antonio - Functional Interactions Among RAD52 Group Proteins
in Recombination and Repair

NOV 21, 2000 -Dr. Zhigang Wang - Univ of Kentucky -Translesion synthesis
by the UmuC family of DNA polymerase

OCT 17, 2000- Dr. Yoshihiro Matsumoto - Fox Chase Cancer Center,
Philadelphia, PA -Functions of PCNA in Base Excision Repair

SEPT 19, 2000 - Dr. Kenneth Kraemer, NCI, Bethesda, MD  -Clinical and
Molecular Features of Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Related Disorders of DNA
Repair

JUNE 20, 2000- Dr. Richard Setlow , Brookhaven National Lab- Reflections
on how I was led into and onto DNA Repair

MAY 16, 2000  Dr. Veronica Maher, Michigan State Univ - Role of DNA
Replication and Repair in Carcinogen-Induced Human Cell Mutagenesis  Host:
U of Michigan [Note: this talk will be posted after the data presented is
published]


Through the miracle of videotape we now have been able to post most of the
DNA Repair Interest Group videoconferences from 1998,1999 and 2000 on the
web site.  These include talks by Drs. Bogenhagen, Sutherland, Kunkel,
Stefanini, Hanawalt, Matson, Sharan, Kashlev , Fornace, Anderson, Leadon,
Brooks, McKay, Drotschmann, Chu, Thompson, Woodgate, George, Liu,
Grossman, Essigman, Emmert, Sobol and Glazer


2. X-RAY SCANNING OF MAIL AND BIOLOGICAL SPECIMENS

Before anthrax was discovered in the mail, I was asked by the NIH Deputy
Director for Intramural Research to try to determine if x-ray scanning of
the mail might have a damaging effect on biological specimens shipped to
NIH labs. This procedure has been instituted in response to the security
threat. I contacted several NIH officials and researchers and gathered the
following information.

The NIH Chief Radiation Safety Officer indicated that the possibility that
the x-ray machine used to examine the mail could actually destroy or
sterilize the mail or damage shipped biological specimens was extremely
remote.  Such a machine is designed to convey the needed information on
content of the mail but deliver the lowest dose possible to the mail and
the operators.  The x-ray dose is between 0.07 and 0.16 mrem per inspected
object. This would be consistent with the objective of not fogging film in
cameras, etc. This is an exceptionally low dose and should not do any
damage to specimens.

By comparison, on the ground background radiation to all organs except the
lung (radon) is on the order of 0.3 mrem per day. In the air, the average
additional background dose from cosmic rays during a 5 hour plane trip is
3 mrem or about 19 times the highest dose delivered by the x-ray scanner.

X- or gamma ray devices for sterilization are extremely high intensity
sources which need to deliver 10's of thousands of rads to the object
being sterilized. Bacterial spores, for example, would be even more
resistant, as they are a relatively simple organism.  If the mail is to be
treated with this high intensity radiation, procedures will have to be
developed to permit shipping of living biological specimens.

3.    CONFERENCES - FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS CONFERENCE;ENVIRONMENTAL MUTAGEN
SOCIETY
[Note: A larger and more up-to-date list of conferences can be found on
the DNA Repair Interest Group web site:
http://www.nih.gov:80/sigs/dna-rep/ ]

3.1 AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR CELL BIOLOGY 41ST ANNUAL MEETING - WASHINGTON,
D.C.- DEC 8-12, 2001

I think that the members of your Interest Group would be interested in the
American Society for Cell Biology 41st Annual Meeting which is in
Washington, D.C., December 8-12 at the Washington, D.C. Convention Center
http://www.ascb.org.   Registration opens at 9:00 AM on December 8. I
recently Exhibited at the NIH Tent Show and was surprised by the number of
Scientists that said that they were doing research in Cell Biology but did
not know that our meeting was in Washington, D.C. in December.  Could you
spread the word to the members of your Interest Group?  For further
details they can contact me. Thanks, Ed Neuman enewman at ascb.org


3.2  ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL MUTAGEN SOCIETY -
Anchorage, Alaska, 27 April - 2 May, 2002

"FRONTIERS BEYOND THE HUMAN GENOME"
Program Chair: Larry Loeb

The program for the 33rd Annual Meeting of the Environmental Mutagen
Society (EMS) is now available at http://www.ems-us.org/program02.html.

A number of symposia and sessions are devoted to DNA repair. These include
"Double-Stranded Breaks: The Ultimate End Game"
"Complex DNA Lesions: Repair and Mutagenesis"
"When Polymerases Are Arrested, Who Is at Fault, and What Are the
Options?"

Please check out the details of the conference at www.ems-us.org. Click on
"meetings."

Abstracts are due November 3rd and are submitted online at
http://www.ibiblio.org/dnam/emsabstracts.htm.

Hope to see you there!
David M. DeMarini
President, EMS
demarini.david at epa.gov





4.      POST DOC AND EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Livermore, CA; Baltimore,
MD; Irvine, CA; Portland, OR; Davis, CA; Livermore, CA; Berkeley, CA;
Boston, MA; Madison, WI [Note: Check the list for more Job Opportunities
on the DNA Repair Interest Group web site:
http://www.nih.gov:80/sigs/dna-rep/ ]

4.1 HUMAN DISEASES WITH DEFECTIVE DNA REPAIR - POST DOC POSITION

We are studying molecular, cellular and clinical abnormalities in patients
with defective DNA repair and possible links of these genes to disease in
the general population. Current emphasis is on xeroderma pigmentosum,
Cockayne syndrome and trichothiodystrophy.  A postdoctoral position is
available for a talented individual (M.D., Ph.D. or MD-PhD) with less than
5 years of postdoctoral experience who has knowledge of molecular biology
and DNA repair.

To apply, send CV and bibliography and names (with contact information) of
3 references to:

Kenneth H. Kraemer, M.D.
Basic Research Laboratory
National Cancer Institute, NIH
Building 37 Room 3E24
Bethesda,  MD 20892
TEL: 301-496-9033    FAX: 301-496-8419
e-mail: kraemerk at nih.gov
http://rex.nci.nih.gov/RESEARCH/basic/lmc/khk.htm

NIH is an equal opportunity employer


4.2  POST DOCTORAL POSITION - BOSTON, MA
A postdoctoral position is available to study the molecular basis for DNA
damage-induced mitotic homologous recombination in mammals. Particular
emphasis is on the how the base excision repair pathway modulates cellular
susceptibility to homologous recombination. Current projects are focused
on using cell culture and whole animal models to explore the mechanisms by
which DNA lesions lead to sequence rearrangements. A system for using
fluorescence to monitor homologous recombination events in adult mice has
recently been developed in this laboratory, thus opening exciting
opportunities to study mechanisms by which genetic and environmental
factors induce homologous recombination in mammals.

For more information, please contact:
Bevin P. Engelward, Sc.D.
MIT Division of Bioengineering and Environmental Health
bevin at mit.edu


4.3 POSTDOC RESEARCH OPPORTUNITY - RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NORTH CAROLINA

Molecular Epidemiology of DNA Repair Fellowship position is available to
investigate the role of human variation in DNA repair on cancer risk.
Studies will examine the correlation between repair phenotype and DNA
repair gene polymorphisms and mutation frequency in preneoplastic and
normal tissue and will also focus on applying phenotypic measures of
repair capacity in samples from case-control studies. Experience with Host
Cell Reactivation, Comet, and Chromosomal Break and other repair assays
desirable. This position is within an interdisciplinary training program
with a primary appointment to the Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis
and adjunct appointment in the Epidemiology Branch.Excellent resources,
equipment, supplies, and opportunities for interdisciplinary training and
development are available.

Candidates should have a Ph.D., M.D. or equivalent degree in molecular
biology, cell biology, biochemistry, genetics, or related field. Applicant
must have less than 5 years of postdoctoral research experience. Recent
graduates are encouraged to apply. Salary $30-36.5K based on experience
plus health benefits. Available October 1, 2001.

APPLY TO:

Jack A. Taylor, MD, PhD, Head
Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology Section, MD A3-05
NIEHS, NIH, PO Box 12233
Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709
E-mail: taylor at niehs.nih.gov
Tel: (919) 541-4631 Fax: (919) 541-2511
http://dir.niehs.nih.gov/dirlmc/lmcmges.htm



4.3  POSTDOCTORAL POSITIONS IN DNA REPAIR RESEARCH AT LAWRENCE
LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY, Livermore, California
Several positions for basic mechanistic studies exist in the Biology &
Biotechnology Research Program (BBRP) for recent PhDs (less than 5 years)
in biochemistry, molecular biology/genetics, or related fields.

To determine the biological function of XRCC2 and related DNA repair
proteins; define biochemical activities, interacting proteins, and XRCC2's
role in vertebrate homologous recombinational repair. Experience in
protein biochemistry, expression, and purification is advantageous. Reply
to Nan Liu at liu3 at llnl.gov

To construct and characterize knockout mutants in DNA repair pathways,
including homologous recombinational repair, in CHO hamster cells; to
study the role of the Fanconi anemia group G gene in maintaining
chromosome stability by using genetic and biochemical approaches; to
obtain the structure of recombinational repair proteins. Background in DNA
repair preferred. Reply to Larry Thompson at thompson14 at llnl.gov

LLNL offers a challenging environment and competitive salary and benefits.
We are located in the scenic Livermore Valley and have interactions with
DNA repair researchers at UC Berkeley, UC San Francisco, UC Davis, and
Stanford University. LLNL is an equal opportunity employer with a
commitment to workforce diversity.

4.3  POST DOCTORAL POSITION -NIA, BALTIMORE, MD
A postdoctoral position for a recent Ph.D. (less than 5 yr of experience)
is available to study DNA helicases defective in premature aging and
cancer syndromes. The goal is to understand the roles of human helicases
in pathways of genome stability. The focus of the work is to understand
how protein and DNA interactions of DNA helicases are important to the
biological roles of these enzymes in DNA metabolism. The postdoctoral
fellow will work in a collaborative group of scientists who have interests
in DNA replication/repair and the emerging field of molecular gerontology.

For more information, please contact:
Robert M. Brosh, Jr., Ph.D.
Laboratory of Molecular Gerontology
National Institute on Aging, NIH
email:  broshr at grc.nia.nih.gov

4.4 POSTDOCTORAL OPPORTUNITY AT UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE

My laboratory has recently knocked out mlh3, a novel DNA mismatch repair
gene with both scientific and medical significance, and has already
generated compound
knockout mouse lines as well.

I seek a highly motivated postdoctoral fellow interested in genomic
characterization of infertility and cancer susceptibility phenotypes in
these mice at my new laboratory at UC Irvine, available September 2001.
Candidates who have recently finished their PhD studies
are particularly encouraged to apply.
Please email cv and contact info for two references to:
Steven M Lipkin M.D., Ph.D. (email: slipkin at uci.edu)

For background information, please read: Lipkin, SM, Wang, V., Jacoby, R.,
Basu, S., Baxevanis, A., Lynch, H., Elliott, R.,and Collins, F. MLH3: A
novel DNA mismatch repair gene associated with mammalian microsatellite
instability and a colon
cancer susceptibility locus in the mouse. Nature Genetics (Article) 2000
Jan 24(1):27-35.




4.5 POSTDOCTORAL POSITION AT OHSU - PORTLAND, OR

A postdoctoral position is available immediately to study the role of DNA
damage and DNA repair in the nervous system.  Particular emphasis is on
understanding the role of BER and NER in maintaining the integrity of
neurons and other cell types of the central and peripheral nervous system.
Current projects involve using whole animal and cell culture models of
various DNA repair mutant mice to explore the role of DNA repair
mechanisms in neuronal cell death and age-related neurodegenerative
disease (e.g., Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Lou Gehrig's disease).
Candidates with training in molecular or cell biology and experience in
mammalian cell culture, protein biochemistry, gene expression,
protein-protein interaction, are encouraged to apply.

For more information, call or email to the address below. To apply, please
send your C.V., a description of your research experience, and the
names,addresses, telephone numbers and email addresses of three
references, to:

Glen Kisby, PhD
Associate Professor
Center for Research on Occupational and Environmental Toxicology (CROET)
Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU)
3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Rd
Portland, OR 97201-3098
Phone: 503-494-2500
FAX: 503-494-6831
E-mail: kisby at ohsu.edu

Portland is an affordable centrally located city in the beautiful state of
Oregon.  The University is only 1 h away from year round skiing at Mt
Hood, the Pacific Ocean, and the scenic deserts of eastern Oregon.  The
campus contains a large group of distinguished faculty with special
emphasis on the nervous system.  CROET is a unique research institute with
faculty that conduct applied research in the workplace (i.e.,
epidemiology) and basic research at the cellular and molecular level.

4.6 TWO POSTDOCTORAL POSITIONS - MECHANISM AND REGULATION OF DSB REPAIR -
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS

Immediate opening for postdoctoral research positions in the laboratory of
Dr. Wolf-Dietrich Heyer in the Section of Microbiology, University of
California, Davis.

Project 1: Mechanism of DSB repair by homologous recombination Biochemical
and molecular analysis of DSB repair proteins using in vivo and in vitro
assays. We focus on the S. cerevisiae Rad54 protein and the later steps in
the recombination process (branch migration, resolution), and on the
biochemical functions of the human Brca2
tumor suppressor protein. For recent publications see: Mazin et al. (2000)
Mol. Cell 6, 583-592; Solinger et al. (2001) JMB 307, 1207-1221; Solinger
& Heyer (2001) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 8447-8453.

Project 2: Regulation of DSB repair by DNA damage checkpoints Biochemical
and molecular analysis of the regulation of the DSB repair protein Rad55
by phosphorylation and of the activation and function of DNA damage
checkpoint kinases in S. cerevisiae. For a recent publication see:
Bashkirov et al. (2000) Mol. Cell. Biol. 20,
4393-4404.

General information:
UC Davis is one of the largest University of California campuses with a
strong emphasis in biology. Studies in DNA metabolism are one focus point
of the Division of Biological Sciences. Davis is a friendly college town
that provides a safe environment with a high quality of life at a
reasonable cost. Davis is located 1 hour East of San Francisco and two
hours West of Lake Tahoe and the ski slopes of the Sierra Nevada.

To apply please send CV and three letters of recommendation to:

Prof. Wolf-Dietrich Heyer
Section of Microbiology
University of California, Davis
One Shields Avenue
Davis, CA 95616-8665

Tel. (530) 752-3001
FAX (530) 752-3011
email wdheyer at ucdavis.edu
http://microbiology.ucdavis.edu/heyerlab/wdhhome.htm


4.7 POST-DOCTORAL POSITION - DNA REPAIR GROUP -LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL
LABORATORY, CA

The major apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease/3 -repair diesterase in
mammals is Ape1. This enzyme initiates repair of abasic lesions and DNA
strand breaks harboring 3 -oxidative damages (e.g. 3 -phosphates and 3
-phosphoglycolates) by incising immediately 5  to the AP site or by
excising 3 -blocking groups directly. Other proteins of BER act in concert
to complete the repair process and preserve genome integrity. Ape1 also
regulates (through an independent "Ref-1" function) the DNA binding
activities of several transcriptional regulators, most notably p53, AP-1
and NF-kB, and in this capacity, may operate as a key factor in cellular
oxidation/reduction (redox) stress responses.

The open post-doctoral position entails defining the contributions of
Ape1's nuclease and redox functions to specific cellular attributes by
overexpressing selectively-inactivating mutant proteins and by creating a
null cell line. Experience in mammalian cell culture/biology is essential.

Please send CV and three letters of recommendation to:

David M. Wilson III, Ph.D.
Biology and Biotechnology Research Program, L-441
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
7000 East Avenue
Livermore, CA 94551
email: wilson61 at llnl.gov
TEL: (925) 423 0695

Position to start this fall. LLNL is an interactive research laboratory
located in the hills of the San Francisco bay area, approximately 45 miles
from the city's downtown.

4.8 DNA DOUBLE-STRAND BREAK REPAIR: BIOCHEMISTRY AND CELL BIOLOGY -
BERKELEY, CA

Immediate opening for postdoctoral research positions in the laboratory of
Dr. David J. Chen at the Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley
National Laboratory.  The successful candidates will participate in an
interdisciplinary research program investigating protein biochemistry,
structure function analysis, and cell biology of the DNA double-strand
break repair (DSB) pathways in mammalian cells. We are interested in the
following research areas:

1 . Mechanisms of DNA nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway.
Characterization of DNA repair complex involved in NHEJ, reconstitution of
DNA end rejoining in vitro, understanding the role of DNA dependent
protein kinase activity in DSB repair and DNA damage sensing, functional
identifying its relevant phosphorylation substrates and radiation-induced
phosphorylation sites.

2. Functions of Homologous Recombination in DSB repair.  Research to
determine the roles of human Rad51 homologs in DNA dsb repair, delineating
the potential functional relationship between homologous recombination and
DNA nonhomologous end joining in radiation-induced dsb repair, effect of
HR in genome instability.

3. Function of DSB repair proteins at the telomere.  Mechanistic studies
on DNA repair proteins that participate in telomere maintenance,
functional analysis of the interaction between telomere binding proteins
and DNA repair protein complex.

Candidates with training in molecular or cell biology and experience in
protein biochemistry, gene expression, DNA homologous recombination
assays, DNA end joining assays, protein-protein interaction, telomere
metabolism and maintenance, or are encouraged to apply.   For application
send letter stating interests with c.v. and names of three references to:

Dr. David J. Chen,
Life Sciences Division, Building 74,
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,
1 Cyclotron Road,  Berkeley, CA 94720,
E-Mail: djchen at lanl.gov, FAX: 510-486-6816

4.9 POSTDOCTORAL POSITIONS AT HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL AND
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY - BOSTON, MA

Two postdoctoral positions are available immediately for an experienced
protein biochemist and a structural biologist who will join a team of
scientists characterizing how DNA base excision repair enzymes interact
with each other and with their DNA substrates. These functional and
physical interactions are being explored by genetic, biochemical, and
biophysical methods. The ultimate goal of these studies will be to capture
these interacting molecules for structural determination by x-ray
crystallography.

Applicants should send their curriculum vitae listing 3 references to:

Prof. Leona Samson (lsamson at mit.edu),
Division of Bioengineering and EnvironmentalHealth,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
77 Massachusetts Avenue,16-743B,
Cambridge MA 02139

or to Prof. Tom Ellenberger (tome at hms.harvard.edu),
Dept. Biological Chemistry and MolecularPharmacology,
Harvard Medical School,
240 Longwood Ave.,
Boston MA 02115.


5       ELECTRONIC CONTACTS:
5.1     Check out the DNA Repair Interest Group web site:
http://www.nih.gov:80/sigs/dna-rep/
You can find the schedule for future DNA Repair Interest Group
videoconferences and a listing of past videoconferences (with links to the
videoarchive) as well as a current list of JOB OPPORTUNITIES in DNA repair
and MEETING NOTICES.

5.2     Encourage your colleagues who are interested in DNA Repair to
request that they be added to this DNA Repair Interest Group listserve
e-mail list by sending a request by e-mail to: listserv at list.nih.gov
Leave the subject  blank. In the message field, type in: subscribe
DNARepair-L your name
        Alternatively, by filling out the form on the website you can both
add your name to the e-mail list and have your name posted on the website.
If you want your name to be listed you can fill out the "Join the SIG"
form on the web site and add your name to the listing of members.  If you
are not at NIH then be sure to click the "other" box and then fill in the
name of your institution.

5.3     Archives of these listserve mailings can be found at
        http://list.nih.gov/archives/dnarepair-l.html
                or via links from the DNA Repair Interest Group web site:
http://www.nih.gov:80/sigs/dna-rep/

5.4     I will be happy to relay information about post-doctoral
positions, jobs and meetings and other information related to DNA Repair.
Please send me an e-mail message (kraemerk at nih.gov) and I will incorporate
it into the next announcement list and post it on the DNA Repair Interest
Group web site: http://www.nih.gov:80/sigs/dna-rep/ .
(This list goes to more than 750 scientists around the world who are
interested in DNA repair.)



Kenneth H. Kraemer, M.D.
Basic Research Laboratory
National Cancer Institute
Building 37 Room 3E24
Bethesda,  MD 20892
301-496-9033    FAX: 301-496-8419
e-mail: kraemerk at nih.gov
DNA Repair Interest Group web site:
http://www.nih.gov:80/sigs/dna-rep/


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