FW: Aspartame & Graves disease

Charles Miller rellim at tulane.edu
Sat Jun 12 14:23:36 EST 2004



From: "Rich Murray" <rmforall at att.net>
Newsgroups: bionet.toxicology
Subject: Justin Dumais, 25, Olympic diver, business graduate, pilot,  
healed of Graves disease (hyperthyroidism) by giving up aspartame:  
Roberts:  Murray 2004.06.11 rmforall
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http://groups.yahoo.com/group/aspartameNM/message/1091
Justin Dumais, 25, Olympic diver, business graduate, pilot, healed of  
Graves
disease (hyperthyroidism) by giving up aspartame: Roberts:  Murray
2004.06.11 rmforall

"The disease most often strikes middle-aged women.
"A 25-year-old male elite athlete is about as far from the stereotypical
Graves patient as you can get," he says.

Now, he has his doctors baffled.
He began taking medication in February but continued doing his own  
research.
He found a nutritionist who suggested he cut aspartame, an artificial
sweetener found in products such as diet soda, from his diet.
In mid-March, he quit diet soda and his medication.
Now, Dumais feels so much better, he questions whether he really has  
Graves'
disease, which has no known cure."

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/olympics/athens/swimming/2004-06-10- 
dumais_x.htm

Posted 6/10/2004 10:03 PM     Updated 6/11/2004 1:04 PM

Disease diagnosis doesn't deter diver     By Vicki Michaelis, USA TODAY

ST. PETERS, Mo. - Justin Dumais was just so tired. Seven months ago, he
hardly could muster the energy for a shower, let alone for the 10-meter
dives he had been practicing more than half his life.

Justin Dumais, left, and his brother Troy compete during the 2004  
Olympic
Team Diving Trials.    Photo By James A. Finley, AP

Initially, he thought he was overtraining. After two weeks, he went to  
his
doctor, who detected a high white-blood-cell count and sent him to a
specialist. The diagnosis: Graves' disease, which causes overproduction  
of
thyroid hormone.

Dumais, headed to the Athens Olympics in August after winning the  
3-meter
synchronized event at this week's U.S. trials, was perplexed.

The disease most often strikes middle-aged women.
"A 25-year-old male elite athlete is about as far from the stereotypical
Graves patient as you can get," he says.

Now, he has his doctors baffled.
He began taking medication in February but continued doing his own  
research.
He found a nutritionist who suggested he cut aspartame, an artificial
sweetener found in products such as diet soda, from his diet.
In mid-March, he quit diet soda and his medication.
Now, Dumais feels so much better, he questions whether he really has  
Graves'
disease, which has no known cure.

He returned to the 10-meter board two weeks ago and will compete in the
individual platform finals Saturday


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