Grad work in virology- Need MD?

Jack M. Bernstein, M.D. Bernstein at WSU-ID.Dayton.OH.US
Mon Nov 14 20:22:49 EST 1994


In article <3a5m7i$1ur at larch.cc.swarthmore.edu> ejnute at raptor.sccs.swarthmore.edu (Eric John Nute) writes:
>From: ejnute at raptor.sccs.swarthmore.edu (Eric John Nute)
>Subject: Grad work in virology- Need MD?
>Date: 13 Nov 1994 18:34:26 GMT

>Hello,
>        In an effort to get to the professionals actually in the field of
>virology, I am posting this message asking whether I need an MD to do
>molecular biology and epidemiology work with viruses.  I am particularly
>interested in the influenza virus and in the herpes virus, and I would
>appreciate any and all advice, preferrably by email.  Currently I am
>applying to many programs that offer PhD's and PhD/MD degrees, but sometime
>in the next year I will probably need to make a more or less final
>decision.  Thank you for you time.

>Eric J. Nute <ejnute at sccs.swarthmore.edu>

As an MD virologist, I would say that NO, you do not need an MD to do what you 
propose. IF you wish to have direct (eg: clinical) contact with patients and 
envision being a clinical investigator with, for instance, anti-virals, an MD 
is a must.

Not to knock an MD. In general, nowadays MDs get paid much better than PhDs 
although their responsibilities are usually broader than a PhDs'. Obviously, 
getting the MD and the requisite psot-MD training takes longer than a PhD.

Good luck!




More information about the Virology mailing list