Plan of attack

Bob or Jason Browning ncarnate at neosoft.com
Fri Dec 1 01:04:27 EST 1995


   Hi, being victomized by this horid head cold has suddenly made me
interested in this.  Please excuse me if my thoughts seem totally insane
(consider it a 
symptom of the cold).  
   OK, to the best of my understanding many viruses travel from person to
person in an RNA form and, once a host is aquired, attacks any given cell,
uses it to
procreate, and in the process morphs an otherwise healthy body into an accursed
waste of flesh with a throbing head, sore (scratchy, raw) throat, watery eyes,
and (of course who could forget) the freak nasty running nose... 

   The body's defense is to have white blood cells (put simply) attack the 
intruder and its offspring, study its protien make-up, and replicate itself in
a form unique to that particular virus so as not to fall victom to it again.
One thing humans have done to speed this process along is to take the near dead
(or dead) form of a virus from someone who's gone through the entire
ordeal and inject that into a healty human so this process of attacking,
studying and eliminating can occur before the healthy virus can invade.

      THESE ARE THE FACTS AS I UNDERSTAND THEM. PLEASE CORRECT ME IF I'M
      COMPLETELY INSANE HERE.

Now, for my question (finally).  Is it possible to, instead of making a flu
shot, find a way to prevent the many varieties of flu from ever attacking that
first host cell.  My logic is that the one thing all these viruses have in
common is the method by which it overcomes a cells defenses and takes it
over.  
Is it known how this is done? Is there a way to use this knowledge to prevent
the virus (perhaps deprive it of a catalyst it needs) from making that all
important first invasion?

Please respond to this group instead of e-mail (I haven't figured that out yet!)

Thanks,
   Jason.



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