Sea Turtle Virus Question

Adrian.Philbey at SMTPGWY.AGRIC.NSW.GOV.AU Adrian.Philbey at SMTPGWY.AGRIC.NSW.GOV.AU
Wed Feb 21 17:52:22 EST 1996



          In my previous response to the posting by Ursula
          Keuper-Bennett (howzit at io.org) about viruses infecting
          sea turtles, I mentioned lymphocystis virus and the
          retrovirus causing walleye dermal sarcoma virus as possible
          models for a tumorigenic virus that could occasionally
          affect the eye. Ursula wrote back saying that there was a
          suspicion that a herpesvirus could be involved in the
          condition she described. Therefore, I have investigated some
          of the literature on herpesviruses that may be relevant.

          Infection of the eye in humans by herpes simplex virus (HSV)
          results from reactivation of latent virus from the
          trigeminal ganglion and can lead to blindness as a
          consequence of a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory
          response in the presence of viral replication. HSV is not
          associated with the development of tumours. A recent
          reference is:

               Babu JS et al (1996) Viral replication is required for
               induction of ocular immunopathology by herpes simplex
               virus J Virol 70:101-107

          Herpesviruses that have been associated with neoplasia and
          formation of tumours in humans are Epstein-Barr virus (EBV),
          Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and possibly
          human herpesviruses 6 and 7, although as far as I know these
          viruses do no infect the eye. EBV has been aetiologically
          associated with Burkitt's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal
          carcinoma, post-transplant B lymphoproliferative disorders
          (lymphomas), T cell lymphomas and, with less certainty, with
          several other neoplasms. KSHV sequences have recently been
          identified in Kaposi's sarcoma, a neoplasm of the skin
          associated with AIDS, but also occurring at low frequency in
          people without AIDS. A recent reference to KSHV is:

               Moore PS et al (1996) Primary characterization of a
               herpesvirus agent associated with Kaposi's sarcoma J
               Virol 70:549-558

          Adrian W Philbey
          Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute
          Private Mail Bag 8
          Camden  NSW  2570
          Australia

          philbea at agric.nsw.gov.au
          nswema05 at angis.su.oz.au




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