Ebola/Hiv multiple questions

Robin M. Weare persepha at csulb.edu
Fri Jan 5 17:07:25 EST 1996


The experts here should correct me if I'm wrong, but this is my 
understanding:

The diseases may all have this in common: the viruses can enter white 
blood cells created by the body to attack them. Because of this, a 
vaccine for one genetic variant of any of these diseases may actually 
leave the patient more vulnerable to infection by another variety.

This is well known to be true of dengue fever. It might be true of HIV, and 
there is some very slim experimental evidence it is true of Ebola (the 
experiment involved a single monkey who survived Reston Ebola coming down 
slightly faster with Ebola Zaire).

So what these viruses have in common (if they do have it in common) may 
make it harder to create vaccines against any of them, not easier.

Robin M. Weare

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