Idea for Potential HIV Cure

Yves Konigshofer BG6S000 at MUSICB.MCGILL.CA
Sun Jan 21 13:32:46 EST 1996


In article <4dkf9s$r3c at usenetp1.news.prodigy.com> RRRP87C at prodigy.com (Matthew Dubeck) writes:
>Here is the basic idea I am working on based on an HIV-cure brainstorm
>which I had one day.  I would appreciate any help, comments, or
>criticisims you can provide.  Here goes...
>
>Take an HIV virus and render it transcription defective.
>(My original idea was by somehow removing the reverse transcriptase or
>mutating it so that it is useless, thus explaining my original post about
>the removal of reverse transcriptase.  Other means could work, and maybe
>you'll have a better idea after the complete explanation.)
>
>Add the gene for promoting programmed cell death (apoptosis) to the
>transcription defective HIV virus.
>
>As far as I see, when this new virus is injected into a HIV negative
>individual, they will be no worse for wear because the virus will simply
>inject its RNA, but because it is transcription defective the RNA will be
>broken down in the cytoplasm without the gene being expressed.
>
>If the new virus is injected into an HIV positive individual, the virus
>will either infect uninfected T4 helper cells, in which case it will
>behave as it would in an uninfected individual, or it will infect a T4
>helper cell which has already been infected by the bad HIV virus, in
>which case the reverse transcriptase (or whatever mechanism is used) will
>be present from the bad HIV and the RNA of our retroviral vector will be
>transcribed.  When this happens the gene for programmed cell death will
>also become active and the infected T4 helper cells will commit "cellular
>suicide."  If all infected cells commit suicide, the bad HIV does not
>have time to infect a host and reproduce, thus dying.
>

First of all, as soon as the new virus is introduced, the immune
system will begin fighting the virus.  Thus, the virus could only be
used for a few days (I wonder what would happen in cases of AIDS).
Secondly, during HIV infection, very large amounts of lymphocytes
are made and killed every day for years.  Personally, I don't think
that all HIV infected cells can be reinfected by the new virus.
Finally, the cells may be infected by another retrovirus other than
HIV which could be the source of reverse transcriptase.

I believe it has been theorized that HIV can induce apoptosis in T-cells
when interacting with the CD4 receptor... but I'm not sure...

Anyway, the only way you'll know whether or not your approach will
work is to test it...

-----------------------cut-here--------------------------------------
>/ves /<onigshofer
Just another student in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology
at the University of McGill... waaay the h*ll up there in Canada

bg6s at musicb.mcgill.ca (I did not choose that name)
If you use IRC, look for Yves_K
other e-mail addresses will appear later this summer/fall



More information about the Virology mailing list