ebola host

Richard H Clancey rhc at world.std.com
Sun Jun 16 04:13:58 EST 1996


	It's generally believed that most of these recently emerging
virus diseases are old organisms.  What is new is not the sudden
appearance of new virus types, but the conditions of transmission.
The continuing economic collapse of Africa, and the associated
collapse of medical care, nutrition, public health and public hygeine,
combined with an increase in mobility of the people (many of whom are
moving around looking for work, or being trucked from job to job) have
all contributed toward creating favorable conditions for the explosive
reproduction of viruses and other infectious agents which have
previously been dormant.

	It would probably be a good thing if we discovered an insect
reservoir for Ebola, since we know how to control insect borne
disease.  But I suspect as long as Ebola remains a "third world
problem" research into it isn't going to get the attention (i.e.
funding) that more immediate threats to the US and Europe, such as
HIV, get.



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