Mentoring & women in sci

Elizabeth H. Harris chlamy at acpub.duke.edu
Thu May 6 11:37:51 EST 1993


In article <1s94ucINNl84 at dns1.NMSU.Edu>, kdurack at dante.nmsu.edu (Katherine
Durack) wrote:
> 
> I found the importance of having female role models to be the most
> interesting point in his summary.  It seems to me that the net might me a
> great medium for connecting budding scientists (of all ages--k-12 on up),
> but that maybe some sort of clearinghouse (matching interested parties)
> might be warranted.
> 

I wonder how many female K-12 readers there are out there.  As the parent
of three teenagers, I have observed with dismay that fooling around with
computers is a popular recreational activity among my son's friends, but
that my daughters' friends have little or no interest in this.  These are
bright girls, many of them from academic families, many with home computers
available.  They even use these computers to type school assignments.  Yet
computer games, much less programming or network communication, are not
considered "acceptable" activities for after-school or weekends.  Likewise,
they don't take part in many science-related activities for fun.  The rare
girl pursuing scientific interests is doing it alone.

When I was 12, I wanted a telescope more than anything, and was considered
very strange, whereas a boy with similar aspirations would have been
thought "normal".  Times don't seem to have changed much.

All of which suggests that yes, girls still need female role models, and
the net might be one way to connect budding scientists, but first, they may
need to be brought into the electronic fold.

Elizabeth Harris
chlamy at acpub.duke.edu



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