grad student advising

hcorbett at garnet.berkeley.edu hcorbett at garnet.berkeley.edu
Fri Sep 17 08:59:59 EST 1993


|Again, a grad student's perspective...
The best thing that you can be for your graduate students is a good
role model. I'm not implying that they will want to be just like you,
but that their advisor can be someone they respect. It's very nice
to be friends with your students, but never talk about your colleagues
with them, etc. This is not to say when you have a bad day, don't show
it - do! But to see that reserach and teachg carry on nevertheless is
great.

I think the previous posting is very germane as to how you should guide
the individual who comes to you. Keep in mind that it is different with
each person, and you are helping to shape your future collaborator. The
best thing to learn in grad school *is* how to ask your question in a 
way that can be asnwered by feasible experiments, and since you have more
expertience than your student, this is where you will help most.

I went to a women's college, and for all my summer reaserach projects
and my frist grad school rotation, I had women advisors, by chance. This
was wonderful, because I could see different women with different life-
styles, all doing great science, and I could imagine fitting myself into 
this role.

Good luck!   Heather



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