women and minority candidates for faculty positions

Estelle Hrabak HRABAKE at MACC.WISC.EDU
Mon Apr 11 13:46:39 EST 1994


>In several committees that I have been involved with, the topic of how
>to increase the number of women and minorities in faculty positions has
>come up several times (because there is a strong desire to do so not only
>University-wide, but also in the School of Agriculture where I am situated)
>.  Competition is keen among open faculty positions, especially with
>as many as 30-60 candidates applying, but the main problem is how to
>increase the number of women and minorities **hired** when they make up a
>very low proportion of the candidate pool and without sacrificing quality.
>A reason that they make up such a low proportion of the total applicant
>pool is that there are very few women and minorities in Agriculture,
>nevertheless there is a strong desire to increase their numbers holding
>positions within our school - the question is how?
>  Another question that
>has come up is retention of women and minority faculty candidates - the
>tenure process is difficult (highly understated) and combined with child-
>bearing, even more so; in regard to minorities, it has been suggested that
>the lack of similar minority types may affect retention of minority faculty
>.  I would be very appreciative if any netters have suggestions with which
>some of these problems can be approached, if not solved, I would welcome
>them and submit them to those in the administration who are in a position
>to something about it.
>
>Regards, Peter
>*************************************************************************
>*  Peter M. Muriana, Ph.D.		Phone	= (317)-494-8284	*
>*  Dept. of Food Science		FAX	= (317)-494-7953	*
>*  Purdue University		E-mail	= muriana at aclcb.purdue.edu	*
>*  W. Lafayette, IN  47907                                        	*
>*************************************************************************
>
I was interested in the idea that minorities like to have "similar minority
types" present on the faculty for retention.  Is this a well-known phenomenon?
As a female, I guess that it might be nice to have other women to talk to but am
wondering if this is also true for other minorities.  Do folks feel that this is
an important consideration in accepting jobs?
 
Estelle
 
P.S.  I wish I knew where there were jobs with only 30-60 applicants.  Most of
the rejection letters I get say that there were anywhere from 150-400 applicants
( :( ).>



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