RE. groups of women

Mona Oommen oommen at brazil.psych.purdue.edu
Fri Jun 17 13:37:05 EST 1994


In article <199406171514.IAA02965 at net.bio.net> susan_forsburg at QM.SALK.EDU ("Susan Forsburg") writes:
>> This is really an interesting approach.  I've used it before in other
>> contexts.  I was wondering if anyone has a reference for this particular
>> study (mixed-gender vs. single-gender groups).  It would be good to be
>> able to back oneself up when students ask, as they invariably do (and
>> should too).  Thank you.
>> 
>> Mona
>
>When I was an undergraduate, at the beginning of the Chem 1A lab, the lab
>supervisor announced, "we know that women will not do as well as men in
>this class."  What was remarkable about this was
>--it was 1980
>--it was at UCBerkeley, a liberal environment
>--the lab supervisor was herself a woman.
>
>Oh yes, and women if I recall correctly were 6 out of the top ten students.
> I often wondered if the supervisor's intent was to make us mad and push us
>to be good that way--because she did.
>
>susan
>
Yeah I can understand how this approach would not go over well at all!
Some people can push ahead, but I'd think a lot more people would be
squelched.  The other approach seems more motivating and more constructive
somehow.

I was wondering how people out there feel about all-womens schools and
colleges as opposed to co-ed.  I went to a co-ed school and an all-women's
college and would not repeat the experience ever --but it was a college
in India and was rather Victorian.  Perhaps women's colleges here are
different?  A cousin of mine goes to a women's school and is planning
to go to an all-women's college (maybe I should have said a "girls'" school).
It would be interesting to hear other people's views on this.  (My cousin
is here in the US).  Do you think it has an impact on assertiveness/ level
of achievement/ self-confidence/ what have you?

Mona





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