gender and ease of getting job

Catherine L. Wallace cwallace at post.its.mcw.edu
Thu Sep 15 21:37:40 EST 1994


mary (bouvier at delphi.com) wrote:
: delete
: I'd love to make my first comment on the internet be profound.  This text
: editor takes some time to master (reminds me of my first HPLC computer)and as a
: resultI'll just make it a brief comment.
: I've been in market driven science (industry) for 10+ years.  Gender issues
: in science industry seems to start just after you get an entry level position.
: I've seen lots of biotech women who remain at the "do-er" level but there are
: a lot less in positions of budget decisions. I've done some tracking on an
: informal basis and women in biotech seem to get better jobs than in the
: pharmaceutical industry but I get the impression - this is one womens opinion-
: that women are not often rewarded as frequently once a biotech industry moves
: into stability (& profitability).
: Are we, as women in science, in a position to change the science industry ?
: Does popular opinion (the Sears TV ad that compares a man shopping at Sears
: to a female neurosurgeon and will not conclude who is smarter) continue to
: undermind our positions as people who can achieve and succeed in traditional
: power roles ?
: I've seen a lot of women leave the science industry leaving few mentors for
: the next generation of scientist (men&women) to emulate.



I am not sure we can blame women for leaving and not being mentors since
being in a medical college research/clincial labs with 2 women that have
been there for over 25 years.  But being in the same spot they started is
hard to feel like becoming mentors.  I myself am the supervisor to ladies my
mothers age, but realize at this institution this is it. I am currently
looking to move on because without an MD or PHD Our secretaries move into
the high ranking admin positions instead of the people whom help really make
it happen. 



More information about the Womenbio mailing list