Postdoc pay

U15767 at UICVM.CC.UIC.EDU U15767 at UICVM.CC.UIC.EDU
Fri Apr 28 12:35:42 EST 1995


On 28 Apr 1995 14:49:02 GMT you said:
>
<snip original message>

>
<snip informative response>

>yes, it is ridiculous that a technician straight out of
>college gets paid more than a postdoc.  But, that's the way
>it is right now.
>
>susan
>susan_forsburg at qm.salk.edu
>
>
Sorry, Susan, I must strongly disagree with you.  I am currently in search of
a post-doc, but before my Ph.D. I spent almost 6 years as a research
technician.  My duties were to run the lab, do the ordering, train the fellows
who did research in our lab as well as run assays etc. for their research
projects.  The post-docs hired after me made a little less or a little more
depending on their experience.  That's the key word - experience.  Give me
a good technician (B.S. degree) with lab common sense over someone fresh out
of graduate school who had a lot of assistance with their experiments - like
maybe by a good technician?  But even straight out of college, a technician's
worth in the lab is often undervalued.  If you have a tech who has a natural
talent for doing good lab work - you know, someone who wasn't the top one in
the chemistry class, but excelled in the lab section - you'll be in good shape.
And don't forget the scut work - like glassware - that is often left to the
tech to deal with.  If you're still with me, let me relate one of my
experiences.  Dealing with a drug that we suspected stuck to glass, a fellow in
our lab and I were discussing how we could treat the glassware.   He
suggested when we wash the tubes, we not rinse off the soap as a treatment.
It was at that time I realized that this gentleman had not done any washing in
the ~1yr he had been with us.  I said we probably shouldn't do that, and that
perhaps he should start doing some dishes so he realized what was involved.
At that point he indignantly told me that he didn't come overseas here to
do such unimportant things such as this.  I answered that neither my job
description nor my degree had anything to do with it either, but it has to get
done.  Mind you, my contributions to the ongoing project were rewarded with a
second authorship.  My boss valued my worth as a tech, so many don't.  I will
try never to undervalue these so-called support employees.
>
Sorry to go on so long!  Underlying point:  there are techs and post-docs
alike that have only a small amount of experience in the lab.  Likewise,
there are those with little common sense (despite brillant minds) in both as
well.  One should be compensated for their worth (contribution).

Janine (technicians of the world unite!)
UIC
U15767 at uicvm.uic.edu



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