Work shoes and other important things

Marla Brunker brunker at delphi.com
Sat Feb 25 14:23:34 EST 1995


Cathy Quinones <quinones at orchid.UCSC.EDU> writes:
 
>my shoes with little buckles."  We were discussing shoes in the context of
>the workplace, which for some includes potential splashes of caustic
>fluids and extended hours of standing on very hard, flat floors.  We were
>talking about the ergonomic problems that result from having to force
>one's feet into shoes that don't fit well, because no adequate options may
>be available, which quickly goes into the topic of occupational hazards. 
 
	An awful lot of people, male and female, end up in the sciences
because there's this myth that you can just "live in your head" and no
social skills are required at all. I believe this is where the stereotype
of the "science nerd" comes from....you see these people, who won't
bathe, iron their clothes, brush their teeth - intelligent and actually
good-hearted people with table-manners that just make you cringe, because
they believe that the quality of their research is the only thing that
matters.
 
	Their careers go quietly into the toilet, of course, and they go
mad from the social isolation.
 	The rest of us figure out that it's in our interests to present
ourselves well professionally (and that we might like lives outside
of the lab). So even if the work-shoe thread didn't deal primarily
with practical considerations (as you pointed out), a discussion of
work-clothes (and even "work personnae") seems entirely relevant to
women's careers in the sciences.



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