Finding work in bio, with kids

Mary Teruel teruel at acpub.duke.edu
Thu Mar 16 16:02:49 EST 1995


In article <3k9acd$51o at newsbf02.news.aol.com> junekk at aol.com (JuneKK) writes:
>This question is in line with my previous question of several days ago (to
>which I still have not received a response!)...
>
>How do women out there have kids and still pursue a research career?
>Finding the time to have kids while getting your Ph.D., doing your
>post-doc training, etc... is one thing.  What to do with them after you
>give birth is another!!
>Many Ph.D.s I know hire nannies or have their parents ("grandma and
>grandpa") take care of their young children while they go to work.  I am
>not sure how much the former normally costs (in the NY area specifically),
>but the latter option is not available to me!  
>

The best situations for dual-research couples with kids that I have
seen seem to be when both researchers are working near each other. Maybe
it is because then it is easier for one person to "cover" for
the other or because by working near each other, it gives
them a chance to see each other more often away from all
the craziness of home & kids. Three examples: 2 assistant
professors here at Duke with a 2 1/2 year old have side-by-side labs.
Two PhD's at Cornell share a lab - when they were both postdocs
applying for faculty positions, they decided to go wherever one
of them got the best offer. She got a professorship at Cornell, and he
came along to share in running the lab. They have 3 kids. 
A friend of ours in NYC is an assistant professor. His wife
who has a PhD works for him. They have a one year old.
In all cases they are doing good research & their family life 
seems sane.  

By the way, I think our friends in NYC are spending around $20,000
a year for their nanny. They live 3 blocks away from their
work so they are able to optimize daycare time by using it
to work instead of wasting time commuting. They also stagger 
their schedule to save daycare costs - she goes in early, he 
plays with the child until the nanny gets there. Then she comes 
home, and he can work late.

Kids take up a tremendous amount of time, and it really
helps to live close to work & daycare.  

Mary



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