creating a good climate for women

Bharathi Jagadeesh bjag at cog.nimh.nih.gov
Thu Jun 13 13:24:52 EST 1996


Susan Hogarth writes
:  _However_, the operative word in your post 
: > seems to me to be the term "private fellowships".
: > Why shouldn't they make whatever conditions 
: > they want? (not _trying_ to be flippant here,
: > I really don't understand). A gov't-supported
: > fellowship would be different, of course.

Jane Dorweiler writes
: In theory, yes, but Gov't fellowships frequently
: have very similar criteria.  

First, it is not true that "private fellowships" can
make whatever conditions they want, since very few
private fellowships are really private. They usually
involve government approval or support in some way, even
if only to the university at which they will be used.

And aside from whether it is legal, there is the more
important question of whether it is right. And there,
I suggest that it is, at the least, inappropriate to
make selection criterion that are not relevant to the
goals desired by the fellowship (i.e. doing good science).

If the fellowships purpose is to foster cooperation among
communities, encourage international cooperation, then
the situation is different. But we do need to be careful
to examine whether the rules are really directed to a
specific goal, or merely exclusionary.

Is evryone suggesting that it would be "right" (or unobjectionalbe)
for private fellowships to use height, eye color, or
physical attractiveness as a criterion for awarding a
fellowship to do science?

--
Bharathi Jagadeesh/bjag at ln.nimh.nih.gov

Lab of Neuropsychology
NIMH
Building 49, Room 1b80
Bethesda, Maryland 20892

(312) 496-5625 x270




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