multiple moves

Barb Lewis barb at nmrfam.wisc.edu
Fri Jun 14 20:03:01 EST 1996


In article <4pqgv9$lq7 at abel.cc.sunysb.edu>, dkat at psych1.psy.sunysb.edu
(DK) wrote:

> I have received several e-mails on this post which in itself I find
> odd.  I assume we do want female presense on the net.  Why do all of
> the females send me e-mail rather than post?
 
(deleted for space)
> 
> Please do not e-mail me.  I consider that something for private
> correspondence only (generally if I'm going to criticize someone I do
> it in private - I did not consider my original post a criticism).  DK

(1) Sorry - on some very busy newsgroups that I read, it is considered *polite*
to send a copy directly in email along with posting. Or even to use only
email for a conversation in which most of the readers of the group won't
be interested. These are newsgroups that tend to have hundreds of posts a
day, so
it's often hard for people to keep track of all the threads to which
they've contributed. So some of us who emailed you were just following a
different convention.

However, since this newsgroup is so small, it really does seem logical, as
you suggest, to simply post on this particular group unless the
conversation really needs to be private.

(2) Phrases such as "grow up", "How anyone could ever... is beyond me.",
and "...never heard such stuff"  *do* sound like criticisms to me!

(3) Finally, for many of us, NONE of your following statements are true:
"the majority of the faculty in our area are female."  "All of them are
married and all of their husbands found jobs one way or the other in the
area within not a terrible length of time."  "I don't even think I know a
housewife"

In other words: very few faculty in the departments I interact with are
female. Of the married ones, only a minority of the husbands made career
changes so their wives could take the jobs here. One female faculty member
here in Chemistry left her tenured position because her husband could not
get a decent job here - she is now working elsewhere in industry, still in
science but not in academics any more. This is after she became the FIRST
WOMAN EVER given tenure in that department! Also, the vast majority of the
male professors *do* have either housewives or at least wives with "jobs"
rather than "careers", and who often stayed home for awhile when the kids
were young. 

So maybe in some areas of science, things now aren't too different from
the way they were in the fifties for you and your colleagues?

Barb Lewis, email barb at nmrfam.wisc.edu - All opinions are my own!



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