high school teachers

Julia Frugoli JFRUGOLI at BIO.TAMU.EDU
Mon Mar 11 10:52:57 EST 1996


>This leads me to ask the group another question: Do you think high 
>school
>science teachers should have an advanced degree in science education or 
>in
>the specific science they want to teach (with the appropriate 
>educational
>credits and certification of course)?  I personally feel that having 
>the
>science degree in a specific discipline is a better idea. What do you
>think?
>
>Dianna


As the mother of 2 high scvhool students, I fervantly hope that this 
would happen.  My children have had some pretty dreadful science 
teachers over the years, and have sometimes been taught things that are 
downright wrong.  (My son once wrote "enzyme" as the answer on a test, 
and the teacher marked it wrong, saying the answer was wrong, it should 
be "protein"  (the protein was an enzyme)).  It took a visit by mom to 
the teacher to explain that enzymes are proteins to correct it.  I 
realize that teaching high school science is not always fun ;) but many 
kids are turned off to science by the attitudes of the teachers, and 
they never come back to it.  A few good teachers make all the 
difference-I am where I am today because my high school biology teacher, 
a woman, taught me to love the subject.  However, like many good 
teachers, she was there by virtue of the fact that that was all a woman 
could do in the 60s and 70s with a science degree.  She still teaches 
today, but at the college level.  The movement of women into science has 
taken many good teachers out of the public school system.  I certainly 
don't want to advocate going back, but I wish we as a society valued 
teachers as much as we seem to value lawyers and business people.  They 
certainly have more of an effect on the quality of life!
Julia Frugoli
Dartmouth College

visiting grad student at
Texas A&M University
Department of Biological Sciences
College Station, TX 77843
409-845-0663
FAX 409-847-8805



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