Babies of graduate students in biology

Sarah L. Pallas spallas at bcm.tmc.edu
Tue Oct 15 17:20:55 EST 1996


In article <jfabian.1195803521A at news.cac.psu.edu> J. Fabian,
jfabian at cmp.hmc.psu.edu writes:
>The National Institutes of Health (NIH) supports a limited number of
>supplements to research grants to encourage fully trained women and men 
>to reenter an active research career after taking time off to care for 
>children or parents or to attend to other family responsibilities.

Does anyone know if these things are ever actually awarded, or was
creating it something NIH had to create to appear family-friendly?   If
it really is a supplement to a research grant, then how likely is it that
you'll get a research grant funded if you've taken time off and not
published for awhile?  It seems a good idea, but with competition for
grants being what it is, I wouldn't advise to anyone to take time off and
count on getting one of these reentry grants.

In relation to this thread, I think grad school is the best time to have
children, if you can afford decent daycare or have some other child care
arrangement.  During your postdoc you really need to crank out the work,
and during your faculty appointment you'll be too busy and probably
infertile by then.  We ended up adopting because we waited too long and
couldn't conceive.  We're quite happy with the outcome and would even
recommend it (no pregnancy, no labor, and our kid is much cuter and
sweeter than he would be with my genes) but it's not for everyone,
especially if you want to propagate your own genes in particular!

Sarah Pallas



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