History of science (was Re: Seeking a BIOnic woman)

Kylie.Shanahan at ffp.csiro.au Kylie.Shanahan at ffp.csiro.au
Wed Feb 19 00:47:58 EST 1997


In article <Pine.SOL.3.93.970218172744.26660B-100000 at icarus.cc.uic.edu>,
   "Veronica I. Arreola" <varreo1 at uic.edu> wrote:

>Let's get on to something bigger...
>
>How do you all feel about grad students getting an empahsis in
>women's/feminist/gender studies that focused on women in science? Do you
>think that being knowledgable in our (aka women in science) history is
>important enough for women to be "certified" (lack of better word) in the
>area? 
>
>Many times we have discussed women in science courses, but who teaches
>these?  Scientists who know little about feminist theory or women who know
>tons on feminist theory but know very little about how science and how it
>feels to be a women scienctist?
>
There was a subject offered by the uni where I did my undergraduate degree 
called "Women and Technology", or something like that.  It was taught in the 
History and Philosophy of Science Dept, by a woman with a PhD in History and 
Philosophy of Science.  So I guess you could say she had a mixture of 
scientific and feminist knowledge.  She also taught a course on Darwinism, 
which I took, and there was a component of feminist teaching in that too, as 
in my course on biotechnology ethics, "Issues in the Modern Life Sciences".  I 
was really lucky to be at a uni with an HPS Department, as it gave me a better 
perspective about science.  I think the unit on Western models of science 
practice should be compulsory!

As to whether it's enough to be knowledgable in the history of women in 
science to be able to teach it (I think that was the question), that really 
depends on the individual.  A number of people in any field lecture without a 
PhD, but that's becoming less common these days and I can't see this field 
being any different.

Cheers,

Kylie.




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