Thanks!

Fisher, Roxanne RFisher at Chatham.edu
Mon Aug 7 15:41:05 EST 2000


How will they know exactly how old your are if you don't put personal stuff
like birthdate on your CV?  If you only have your graduation dates they
won't know how old your are since they will be recent.  Anyway, even if you
start a tenure track job at 45 you still have 20-25 possible years at that
institution.  In my mind, that's long enough!  I started thinking of this
when my PhD advisor was having a midlife crisis at 40 or so and realized
that he'd have 25 more years to go until retirement.  He'd been a professor
at the same institution since he was 27. 

Of course I'm biased since I started my Ph.D. at 28 and went on the job
market for liberal arts college jobs at 38.  No one seemed to care one bit
about my age and they were all very interested in my before grad school
experience.

Roxanne 

************************************************************************
**
Roxanne H. Fisher                                  rfisher at chatham.edu
Assistant Professor of Biology                  phone (412)365-1893
Chatham College                                     fax (412)365-1505
Woodland Road
Pittsburgh, PA 15232
***********************************************************************



-----Original Message-----
From: cjfuller at mindspring.com [mailto:cjfuller at mindspring.com]
Sent: Monday, August 07, 2000 1:44 PM
To: bionet-women-in-bio at net.bio.net
Subject: Re: Thanks!


In article <398C61DD.E7ABD268 at calstatela.edu>, "Vellanoweth's Lab"
<jwheele at calstatela.edu> wrote:

snipped>
>Several of you also mentioned ageism.  This is my biggest fear... If I'm
>37 now, 38 by the time I finish my undergrad... I'll be 43+ when I
>finish my doctorate.  Although I look pretty young (got those good
>genes... hmmmm... maybe I can clone them....) I worry that ageism will
>diminish my chances for a good job.
>

Janel-Not all universities practice ageism in their assistant professor
hiring.  I finished my PhD at 35, did a postdoc for 3 years, and then was
hired as an assistant professor at a smaller university.  Most of us
currently in the dept went back to get our PhD's after many years. Our
department is searching for an assistant professor right now.  We brought
in 4 candidates-two of them were over 40.

You might want to consider doing an MS rather than going all the way for a
PhD.  My first MS student is now working at NIEHS.  She got in on the
ground floor on DNA microarrays about a year ago and now runs that lab.

Cindy

-- 
C.J. Fuller
<mailto:cjfuller at erickson.uncg.edu>
<mailto:cjfuller at mindspring.com>








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