CENSORED by SIGGRAPH: ( Xochi Speaks ) Psychedelic Educational Media

Lord Nose! lordnose at well.sf.ca.us
Thu Jul 16 12:50:53 EST 1992


AN OPEN LETTER TO SIGGRAPH '92
July 15, 1992

Greetings! This posting is re: the Association of Computing Machinery's 
SIGGRAPH '92 computer graphics conference, to be held this month in 
Chicago, and the decidedly poor experiences we have had with some of the 
conference planners, particularly the Chair of the G-TECH committee, 
Branko J. Gerovac (casting a shadow on his affiliations, the MIT Media 
Laboratory and Digital Equipment Corporation, for his obvious lack of 
professionalism).
The SIGGRAPH '92 Advance Program states, "G-tech goes beyond the limits."
G-tech goes beyond the limits? It sure did. Right into the CENSORSHIP of 
information... LordNose! submitted a multimedia G-TECH proposal, 
XOCHI SPEAKS, a unique and important educational tool. Noted 
ethnopharmacologist Dennis McKenna, PhD, has described XOCHI SPEAKS as,
"a quick crash course in the prototypical psychedelics, along with some 
very practical and down-to-earth advice in how to derive the most 
benefit from these substances and how to avoid psychedelic short fall--
or worse."
Medicinal chemists Drs. David E. Nichols and Robert C. Pfaff, at Purdue 
University, created the twelve energy-minimized, space-filling molecular
models. Interestingly, these molecular renderings had never been seen 
together before inclusion in this project. 
XOCHI SPEAKS was CENSORED on the basis of its CONTENT and not its form.
On three separate occasions, we were told by different SIGGRAPH 
representatives that the conference motto was "WE INVITE CONTROVERSY".
Balderdash!
Dr. Alexander T. Shulgin, famed pharmacologist/chemist, said: "This 
society has made self-exploration against the law." LordNose! cannot and 
will not stand by silently, as OUR first amendment rights are trampled 
by troglodytes feeding at the trough of the military industrial complex.
The LordNose! presentation was centered on an interactive slide show, 
the 24" by 36" XOCHI SPEAKS print itself, and the distribution of free 
software. Although June 3, 1992 was the date for "notification of 
acceptance or rejection", as stated in the '92 CALL FOR PARTICIPATION, 
LordNose! has never been officially notified regarding the rejection nor 
have our submission materials been returned. Also, our telephone calls, 
FAXes, and e-mail to Mr. Gerovac at the MIT Media Lab, DEC, and 
SIGGRAPH.ORG have not been acknowledged.
Other '92 G-TECH entrants are encouraged to respond regarding their own 
experiences, as well comments from any other interested individuals. 
These are most unfortunate times when the arts in America come under 
fire from myopic, mean-spirited, closed-minded, fear-driven, avaricious 
white men.
Our original G-TECH proposal, which was submitted via e-mail in the 
beginning of May, follows. The full text of Dennis McKenna's review can 
be found in MONDO 2000, issue #7, due out the end of July and available 
at SIGGRAPH '92.

Our motto: "THE ADVANCEMENT AND DIFFUSION OF KNOWLEDGE IS THE ONLY 
GUARDIAN OF TRUE LIBERTY." -- James Madison, 4th US President
=================================================================== 
To: g-tech at siggraph.org
Subject: G-Tech Submission

[Note: The following list of words are properly italicized
       where they appear in this document.

		Xochi Speaks
		Turbina coymbosa
		Psilocybe aztecorum

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

*Coverpage*

         Status:  final
           Date:  May 4, 1992
          Title:  Xochi Speaks

Primary Contact:  Lord Nose!
                  PO Box 170473C
                  SF, CA 94117-0473
                  lordnose at well.sf.ca.us

    Description:  

The Xochi Speaks poster features Xochipilli, together with concise,
up-to-date scientific information on a dozen psychedelic compounds,
each represented by an energy-minimized, three-dimensional rendering
of its structure together with traditional schematic diagrams.

       Abstract: 
 
The pre-Columbian statue of the Aztec deity Xochipilli, 
"Prince of Flowers," was discovered over 100 years ago 
near the sacred volcano Popocatepetl in southern Mexico.
Various speculations on its significance have been offered,
but only recently has an adequate explanation been forthcoming.
It now appears that the work portrays this masked being 
undergoing a psychedelic experience! Not only is his awestruck
expression of spiritual ecstasy apparent, but a careful 
inspection of the figure and its base reveals carvings of 
traditional sacred plants. Most have been botanically identified 
and include "Ololuihqui," a morning glory (Turbina corymbosa) 
endowed with lysergic acid derivatives, and "Xochinanacatl," 
a psilocybin-containing mushroom (Psilocybe aztecorum) known 
to grow only on this volcano. Despite oppression by the Spaniards 
and subsequent governments, natives of these regions continue to 
employ both of these species and many others in their present-day 
religious rituals.


         Format:  Poster presentation, slide show, audience
                  participation

       Keywords:  H.5.2 Training, help, documentation
                  J.2   Chemistry
                  K.4.1 Transborder data flow

        Visuals:  One 24" by 36" poster, slide set.

[A sample _Xochi Speaks_ poster was mailed to Branko J. Gerovac
at the (E15-390) MIT Media Lab address on May 1, 1992, along with
a release form from the Call For Participation.  Someone will
telephone (617-253-0669) on May 5th to check that it arrived safely.]

------------------------------------------------------------------------
*Description*

An ~2,500 word article on the poster will appear in the summer 
issue of the _Whole Earth Review_, along with Xochipilli and the
molecules on the back cover.  

We're not advocating illegal drug use, just giving some factual
grounding to the population that already uses these compounds and
to counter some of the poisonous propaganda out there.  Most of the
information circulating is erroneous, emphasizing either the simple
hedonistic aspects of particular substances, or warning of the 
ominous consequences of their use.

Rather than our own description, here are two from two very qualified
authors and researchers:

"I'm glad to see this [poster].  This is a good thing.  Xochi Speaks
seems to me very neutral... simply presenting this important information
in a graphically digestible and interesting way.

"Finally there will be a counter force to all the exaggeration and
mythology that has poisoned the well of public discourse on this issue.
This [poster] is the culmination of a lot of research that has long
needed to be gathered into one place.  The intuitive hit that I get
out of seeing the molecular models arrayed in a series like this is
very powerful.

"I think every educational institution in the country should have
one of these.  Certainly counselors, doctors and school psychiatrists,
people like that..."

        -- Terence McKenna, ethnobotanist/lecturer


"This poster is a beautiful balance between artistic quality and
scientific accuracy.  A remarkable achievement."

        -- Dr. Alexander T. Shulgin, pharmacologist/chemist


------------------------------------------------------------------------
*Presentation Logistics*

Presentation Description:

    Yes, we will need to be present during our presentation, although
    the poster will hopefully remain displayed during other times.

    Our slide show will revolve around the poster and its creation,
    feature information of greater detail, and bring attendees into
    the discussion.  Free materials will also be distributed.

Hardware/Software Requirements:

    We would rather share a SIGGRAPH slide projector, already setup,
    and an appropriately large viewing screen, than haul our own
    projector to the conference.

    The poster should receive an area 6 feet wide by 7 feet high.

Special Requirements:

    None.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
*Supplementary Description*

A sample _Xochi Speaks_ poster was mailed to Branko J. Gerovac
at the (E15-390) MIT Media Lab address on May 1, 1992, along with
a release form from the Call For Participation.




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