post-doc available in plant molecular genetics

Nobody nobody at hgmp.mrc.ac.uk
Wed Jun 12 18:55:57 EST 2002


<x-charset iso-8859-1>POST-DOCTORAL POSITION IN PLANT MOLECULAR GENETICS
Department of Plant Biology (http://www.cbs.umn.edu/plantbio/pbio/)
University of Minnesota (http://www1.umn.edu/twincities/)
St. Paul, Minnesota

         A post-doctoral position is available as of Aug. 20, 2002 to study
the effects of soluble sugars on plant gene expression and development.
Despite the fact that sugar levels are believed or known to help regulate a
diverse array of developmental and metabolic processes, such as time to
flowering and starch metabolism, little is known about the molecular
mechanisms by which sugars and/or sugar metabolites act as signaling
molecules.  Several sugar-response mutants of Arabidopsis have been
isolated.  Unlike wild-type plants, these sugar-insensitive (sis) mutants
form expanded cotyledons and true leaves on media containing high levels of
glucose or sucrose. The successful applicant will have an opportunity to
continue the characterization of these mutants. Some of the genes
identified by these mutations have also been cloned and are being
characterized. This position will also provide the successful applicant
with an opportunity to use DNA chips to analyze sugar-regulated gene
expression in wild-type and mutant plants. For further information
regarding this project, please refer to the following publications:
1) Laby, R.J., Kincaid, M.S., Kim, D., and Gibson, S.I. (2000). The
Arabidopsis sugar-insensitive mutants sis4 and sis5 are defective in
abscisic acid synthesis and response. Plant J. 23, 587-596.
2) Gibson, S.I. (2000). Plant sugar-response pathways. Part of a complex
regulatory web. Plant Physiol. 124, 1532-1539.
3) Gibson, S.I., Laby, R.J., and Kim, D. (2001). The sugar-insensitive1
(sis1) mutant of Arabidopsis is allelic to ctr1. Biochem. Biophys. Res.
Commun. 280, 196-203.

	The University of Minnesota provides excellent research and
educational opportunities. The successful applicant will have convenient
access to a diverse array of modern facilities, including the Advanced
Genetic Analysis Center, Bioinformatics and Research Computing Facility,
Protein Expression and Purification Lab, High-Throughput Screening and
Analysis Center, Imaging Center and Mass Spectrometry Facility (see
http://www.cbs.umn.edu/biodale/ for more information regarding facilities).
Additional facilities will be available through the Center for
Computational Genomics and Bioinformatics and the new Institute for
Microbial and Plant Genomics. The Minneapolis/St. Paul ("Twin Cities") area
is often cited as providing one of the highest qualities of life among
major US cities. Diverse cultural and recreational activities are easily
available (see http://www.exploreminnesota.com/ for more information).
	Applicants should have experience in molecular biology,
biochemistry and/or plant biology.  Applicants should submit a curriculum
vitae (resum=C8), a letter stating their research interests/experience and
the names and addresses of three references to the address shown below. The
University of Minnesota is committed to the policy that all persons shall
have equal access to its programs, facilities, and employment without
regard to race, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital
status, disability, public assistance status, veteran status, or sexual
orientation.

INTERESTED PEOPLE WHO WILL BE ATTENDING THE ARABIDOPSIS MEETING ARE
ENCOURAGED TO CONTACT DR. GIBSON AS SOON AS POSSIBLE TO ARRANGE A TIME TO
MEET IN SEVILLE.

Prior to July 27, 2002:
Dr. Sue Gibson
Rice University
Dept. of Biochemistry and Cell Biology - MS140
George Brown Hall
6100 Main St.
Houston, TX   77005-1892
E-mail:  sig at bioc.rice.edu

After Aug. 3, 2002:
Dr. Sue Gibson
Department of Plant Biology
University of Minnesota
220 Bio Sci Center
1445 Gortner Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55108-1095
E-mail:  sig at bioc.rice.edu



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