IUBio

Brainwashed - http://www.guardian.co.uk/health/story/0,3605,630152,00.html & LYRICS

Robert Born t.h.x.1138 at web.de
Thu Jan 17 07:50:37 EST 2002


In order to specify my statement far below:

The conclusive negation "WRONG" in the 
second heading IS wrong!

It couln'd NEVER function in another way!!!

But this is not really the question as I explained 
in my answer in German.

But YES indeed, you can really BRAINWASH someone!

Some people poison you & later the docs say you paranoia.
This is not possible - in medical or legal concerns.

But uhhh, that's happen to me ...

Robert Born - more info??? - so have a look @:
http://www.x0rk.com/born/2002/misc/netsig.html

***

From: Gruppe N (Gruppe_N at gmx.net)
Subject: Vorschlag für eine kluge Frage 
Newsgroups: de.sci.medizin.psychiatrie, de.sci.psychologie
Date: 2002-01-11 00:58:04 PST 


http://www.guardian.co.uk/health/story/0,3605,630152,00.html

Brainwashed

Mental illnesses are caused by chemical imbalances in the brain, right?
Wrong, says Craig Newnes

Thursday January 10, 2002
The Guardian

Let's start with a true story. A colleague in the US visited her
grandson in a psychiatric hospital and discovered that in his first few
days there he had been drugged into a stupor. She insisted on seeing the
medical staff, and three psychiatrists told her that her grandson had a
bipolar disorder caused by a brain-biochemical imbalance. Quietly, but
firmly, she asked what evidence they had that there was something wrong
with his brain. They said his mood and behaviour indicated a serious
problem. She asked how they knew this was caused by brain biochemistry.
Slightly uncomfortable, they vaguely referred to research indicating
that this was the case. Much more confident now, my colleague said she
knew of no studies that had ever confirmed this idea, even though it is
a common assumption in the psychiatric world, and quoted studies
indicating that there was nothing wrong with the brains
of people with all sorts of psychiatric labels. Sensing that they were
dealing with someone who might have read the literature, they asked what
she wanted.
Her grandson was quickly transferred to a unit offering talking
therapies.
My colleague didn't ask the question that all patients, relatives and
advocates should ask when told that a brain-biochemical problem lies at
the root of someone's low mood or strange behaviour. She could have
said: "Can I see the test results, please?" The truth is that, unlike
all other doctors, psychiatrists do not do physical tests to confirm
their diagnoses. The reason is simple: it is not seen as necessary to
prove that there is something wrong with the brains of patients
diagnosed as schizophrenic, bipolar, depressed and so on. The organic
hypothesis, however, remains unproven.

All sorts of claims about the physical causes of psychological problems
continue to be made in the scientific literature and popular press.
Professor David Cohen, a critic of psychiatry, has noted that almost all
the substances operating within the human body have been investigated as
a possible cause of schizophrenia. This research is leaked to the press
before it has been accepted in a peer-reviewed journal and "the results
are likely to be cited around the world, thought they may never make it
to scientific
publication". We are also well aware of the massive conflicts of
interest involved in the studies that do finally appear in the official
literature.
Effective Health Care, in reviewing the newest so-called anti-psychotic
medication, concluded: "Most relevant trials are undertaken by those
with clear pecuniary interest in the results."

Some conditions - alcohol-induced dementia, for example - show real
signs of brain damage. This is rare. To date, studies have failed to
demonstrate that people with the commonest psychiatric diagnoses have a
brain-biochemical imbalance. The studies on all the main diagnostic
categories of psychiatry are plagued by a significant problem: the
people being tested have almost always already received psychotropic
medication, so if there is a blood, brain or liver disorder, this may
have been caused by the treatment.
Physical tests on people diagnosed, but not yet treated, in the
psychiatric system, would be the only way to find out if there were a
difference between these people and the general public. This never
happens, as most people first encounter a GP who, instead of asking for
blood and other tests to demonstrate a psychiatric condition, simply
prescribes a psychotropic drug or refers on to a psychiatrist.

Psychiatrists, of course, do ask for tests such as CT scans on their
patients, but these are to exclude the possibility of brain damage. In
other words, they are checking to see if there is a real brain problem,
evidence of illegal drug use or whatever. Once they have concluded that
there is nothing demonstrably amiss with the patient's brain or
biochemistry, they tell the person that they have a condition that
results from a biochemical problem. But they don't have a test that
could prove a so-called mental
illness was actually organic in origin. That's why patients are not
offered tests of brain chemistry.

Imagine the same situation in oncology: you are told that you look like
you have cancer, offered no tests, and told you will have two
operations, followed by radiotherapy and a course of drugs that makes
your hair fall out. The idea is preposterous. You demand proof of your
condition. An x-ray, a CT scan and blood and liver tests reveal that the
diagnosis was accurate. Reassured, though still very scared, you agree
to the treatment.

So next time you are told that a psychiatric condition is due to a
brain-biochemical imbalance, ask if you can see the test results. Craig
Newnes is psychological therapies director for Shropshire's Community
and Mental Health Services NHS Trust. His most recent books are This is
Madness Too and Spirituality and Psychotherapy, both available from PCCS
Books.

**************

From: Robert Born (robert.born at web.de)
Subject: Re: Vorschlag für eine kluge Frage 
Newsgroups: de.sci.medizin.psychiatrie, de.sci.psychologie,
de.sci.medizin.misc, de.soc.recht.misc
Date: 2002-01-15 12:40:11 PST 


Gruppe N wrote:
> 
> http://www.guardian.co.uk/health/story/0,3605,630152,00.html
> 
> Brainwashed
> 
> Mental illnesses are caused by chemical imbalances in the brain, right?
> Wrong, says Craig Newnes
> 
> Thursday January 10, 2002
> The Guardian

[...]

IMHO laesst der Textbody jene Ueberschrift nicht zu!

Nach meinem Verstaendnis des oag. Textes ist die
Implikation, dass ein organischer Faktor ein
chemisches Ungleichgewicht im ZNS verursacht
geradezu zwingend und insbesonders kausal.

Die Frage stellt sich eher - ganz in Analogie zu
meinem Fall - hinsichtlich der stringent anzuwendenden
Ausschliessungskriterien bei der Differentialdiagnose.

Laut Entscheidungsbaeume bei der Differentialdiagnose
des DSM sind bei allen "psych. Stoerungen" im
allerersten Schritt sogn. organische Faktoren
(ab DSM-IV unterteilt in interne MKF == Medizinische
Krankheitsfaktoren und extern substanzinduziert)
auszuschliessen.

Dies betrifft die Psychotischen Stoerungen, Affektive
Stoerungen (uaa. Bipolare St.), Angststoerungen, und
sogar die Somatoforme Stoerungen.

Wenn zB. ein Arzt - trotz Hinweis - ohne Drogentest
eine Psychose diagnostiziert, handelt nicht nur
diametral gegen den Standard und med. absolut falsch,
sondern kann durch seine Unterlassung auch Beweise
fuer eine Vergiftung von Drogen mit geringer meta-
bolischer Halbwertszeit (zB. Amphetamin) passiv
vernichten, welches zudem eine Mittaeterschaft
beinhaltet.

Aus diesem Grund brauche ICH auch meine Verfolgung
nicht mehr zu beweisen, da aus besagten Grund die
Indizien fuer eine Verfolgung vernichtet wurden,
welches zudem die Diagnose Verfolgungswahn nicht
zulaesst.

Gut das SIE mir somit auch nicht mehr das Gegenteil 
beweisen koennen.

-- 
Robert Born - more info??? - so have a look @:
http://www.x0rk.com/born/2002/misc/netsig.html


Madison Avenue - Don't Call Me Baby

Thanks to ash316 at start.com.au for these lyrics.

http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~denisg/music/madcmb.htm


You and me we had a opportunity
And we could make it something really cool
But you, you think im not the kind of girl 
I'm hear to tell ya baby I know how to rock your world

Don't think that I am that strong
I'm the one to take you on
Don't under estimate me
Boy ill make you sorry you were born
 

You don't know me the way you really should
You're sure misunderstood
Don't call me baby 

You got to know that that will never do
You know I don't belong to you
Its time you knew im not your baby
I belong to me 
So don't call me baby

Behind my smile is my IQ
I must admit this does not sit with the likes of you
You're really sweet mmm you're really nice
But didn't mama ever tell ya not to play with fire

Don't think that I am that strong
I'm the one to take you on
Don't under estimate me
Boy ill make you sorry you were born
 
You don't know me the way you really should
You're sure misunderstood
Don't call me baby

You got to know that that will never do
You know I don't belong to you
It's time you knew im not your baby
I belong to me
So don't call me baby

You and me we had a opportunity
And we could make it something really cool
But you, you think im not the kind of girl 
I'm hear to tell ya baby I know how to rock your world

Don't think that I am that strong
I'm the one to take you on
Don't under estimate me
Boy ill make you sorry you were born

You don't know me the way you really should
You're sure misunderstood
Don't call me baby

You got to know that that will never do
You know I don't belong to you
It's time you knew im not your baby
I belong to me
So don't call me baby

You got to know that that will never do
You know I don't belong to you
It's time you knew im not your baby
I belong to me
So don't call me baby




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